Rachel Ernst
As the need for healthcare increases, we find new ways to make health care more convenient for patients. Through Telehealth, access to health care increases, saving patients time and money for the same counseling solutions.
Diane Farrell, LCSW

Returning to life as the COVID-19 restrictions loosen may be much harder than anyone had expected.   The experts refer to this as a “new normal” but it is not clear what this may mean for all of us emotionally. 

Diane Farrell, LCSW
May has been designated as “Mental Health Awareness Month." Now, more than ever we are seeing the connection between our physical health and mental health. As we enter the third month of a pandemic, we learn many things about the symptoms that can impact both.
Liberty Grzybowski, LCSW

We as human beings are social creatures whose most basic needs include the need for being socially connected.  If you or someone you know is in recovery from a substance use disorder, you know that being able to connect to other individuals in recovery is an important component to maintaining sobriety.  During this time of uncertainty with the spread of COVID-19, self-isolation and boredom that comes with social distancing can trigger a relapse on drugs or alcohol.

Diane Farrell, LCSW

Over the last several days, our lives have changed because of the COVID-19.   This virus has been a source of fear and anxiety for a lot of people.  Fear about a disease can be overwhelming and lead to strong and unhealthy emotions.  Learning to cope with these feelings can reduce stress and make you stronger and more helpful to others.  We do not have all of the answers in this situation, but hopefully, we can help you put this in perspective.