Liberty Grzybowski, LCSW

We as human beings are social creatures whose most basic needs include the need for being socially connected.  If you or someone you know is in recovery from a substance use disorder, you know that being able to connect to other individuals in recovery is an important component to maintaining sobriety.  During this time of uncertainty with the spread of COVID-19, self-isolation and boredom that comes with social distancing can trigger a relapse on drugs or alcohol.

Diane Farrell, LCSW

Over the last several days, our lives have changed because of the COVID-19.   This virus has been a source of fear and anxiety for a lot of people.  Fear about a disease can be overwhelming and lead to strong and unhealthy emotions.  Learning to cope with these feelings can reduce stress and make you stronger and more helpful to others.  We do not have all of the answers in this situation, but hopefully, we can help you put this in perspective. 

Amanda Stone, LCPC

In the midst of this sweeping pandemic, humankind is being faced with an abrupt new reality…our lives are going to change and we are not exactly sure how, yet. As people are asked to stay in their homes to limit human contact and exposure to the COVID-19 virus, many of us are faced with an unsettling concern and uncertainty.

Mike Lau

Anxiety is a signal our mind and body gives us that danger is near. That danger may come from internal or external sources. Often times stress and anxiety will be cumulative and will draw upon our personal and physical resources. Everybody has different levels of tolerance for different levels of stress and anxiety but excessive stress and anxiety can lead to lowered self-esteem and feelings of depression.

Mike Lau

What comes to mind when you think of taking risks with your health – driving recklessly, or maybe abusing alcohol or illegal drugs? Those behaviors are very risky but many people have less dramatic behaviors that are just as dangerous in the long run. Tobacco use, unbalanced nutrition and a lack of physical activity are some of the key risk factors for the most common causes of death.

The top 10 causes of death include: