Tammy Thieme

Have you ever noticed that the word stressed spelled backwards spells desserts?  Think of the last time you had a really good dessert.  You slowed down, savored the flavor and enjoyed it. 

In recognition of Mental Health Month, I am encouraging you to add a little dessert to your day as an effort to reduce stress.  Not the high caloric type but the type that adds positive life skills to your every day life.

Here are some examples of what you can do:

Ron Benner

Interpersonal communication skills consist of the verbal and non-verbal cues that a person uses to communicate their thoughts, feelings and ideas with another person. These behaviors have been learned and with reflection, practice, and guidance, one can identify possible problems and make changes to improve their ability to communicate.

How to identify problems:

Mike Lau

Anger is a completely normal, usually healthy, human emotion. When it gets out of control it can turn destructive and can lead to problems at work, in your personal relationships, and in the quality of your life. It can also make you feel as though you are at the mercy of an unpredictable and powerful emotion.

Anger can be caused by both internal and external events. You can be angry at a specific person or event, or your anger could be caused by worrying or brooding about your personal problems. Even memories of traumatic or enraging events can also trigger angry feelings.

Mike Lau

Oftentimes the holidays will bring about a certain level of unwanted stress in our lives. If not dealt with in an effective and healthy way this stress and depression can often ruin our holidays and impact our health. Being realistic, planning ahead and seeking support from others can help ward off stress and depression.

Mike Lau

The occasional experience of sadness and depression occurs during the life course of most people and virtually everyone in his or her life has been depressed at one time or another. Depression is a normal response to loss or disappointment. When depression persists and/or becomes so severe that it significantly disrupts a person’s world, depression may become pathological. Normal depression is characterized by a brief period of sadness, grief, or dejection in which disruption of normal functioning is minimal.